I Think I am Against a Senate Impeachment Trial for Trump

Jeffrey C. Isaac is the James H. Rudy Professor in the Department of Political Science at Indiana University. The best thing now is to let Trump leave the White House in disgrace, to do everything possible to put him out of the public mind, and to move forward politically with the business of Democratic governance and democratic citizenship. I think I am against a Senate impeachment trial. I think I am. I’m not sure. I am sure about little these days. But I am pretty sure that a Senate trial is not a very good idea. Of course Trump deserves … Continue reading I Think I am Against a Senate Impeachment Trial for Trump

Impeachment vs. Censure: Constitutional Law, Politics, and the Art of the Possible

Brian C. Kalt is Professor of Law & The Harold Norris Faculty Scholar at Michigan State University College of Law One difficulty in writing about President Trump and impeachment—or about President Trump and anything, really—is that the news cycle has become so short. Events often overtake predictions. We cannot know what Trump and others will do and say between now and the end of the Senate trial. As such, we cannot know how many senators will vote to convict. But at some point, perhaps well before the trial is over, Democrats may conclude that they have no possibility of garnering … Continue reading Impeachment vs. Censure: Constitutional Law, Politics, and the Art of the Possible

Symposium on Impeachment

Susan McWilliams Barndt is Chair and Professor of Politics at Pomona College. On the one hand: I study American political thought and history. So I understand that impeachment is a big deal. On the other hand: I’ve already lived through three impeachments. So I understand that impeachment is banal. On the one hand: I don’t want to be glib because this may well be a moment of real significance in the history of the republic. On the other hand: Been there, done that. * * * When we’re talking about impeachment, here’s an underlying problem: Right now, it is hard … Continue reading Symposium on Impeachment

Congress, Impeachment, and Constitutional Redemption

George Thomas is Wohlford Professor of American Political Institutions and Director of the Salvatori Center at Claremont McKenna College. On January 6th President Trump urged his supporters to violently storm Congress while it was in the process of formally counting the electoral votes that would recognize Joe Biden as the next president of the United States. Let’s be exquisitely clear about a few things. The President called for a violent attack on another branch of government. He did so in an effort, however feeble, to keep himself in power despite having lost the election. For the first time in American … Continue reading Congress, Impeachment, and Constitutional Redemption

Citizenship or Followership? Democracy and Demagogy from an Aristotelian Perspective, by Joseph M. Knippenberg

Joseph M. Knippenberg is Professor of Politics at Oglethorpe University. His teaching and research interests include history of political philosophy, religion and politics, and contemporary liberal theory. Continue reading Citizenship or Followership? Democracy and Demagogy from an Aristotelian Perspective, by Joseph M. Knippenberg

Political Resignations: Comparing the Watergate and Trump Eras, by Jeffrey Abramson

Political resignations can be a matter of great conscience and statesmanship. Or they can be the too little, too late scurrying of rats off a sinking ship. The last few months of the Trump Administration resemble the end of the Nixon presidency in giving us some of both. Continue reading Political Resignations: Comparing the Watergate and Trump Eras, by Jeffrey Abramson